The GMAO Research Site

The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) supports NASA's Earth Science mission. Activities in Earth System modeling and data assimilation aim to maximize the impact of satellite observations on analyses and predictions of the atmosphere, ocean, land and cryosphere.

Science Snapshots
The Roles of Climate Change and Climate Variability in the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season thumbnail

The Roles of Climate Change and Climate Variability in the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season

The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season was extremely active with six major hurricanes, the third most on record. This study identified the causes of the strong tropical cyclone activity in 2017, with a focus on the long-term linear climate trend and the leading modes of climate variability that impact seasonal tropical cyclone activity over the Atlantic.
1
Mid-Atlantic Local Area Flooding, July 21-25, 2018 thumbnail

Mid-Atlantic Local Area Flooding, July 21-25, 2018

July 2018 began with record-setting dry conditions in the Mid-Atlantic region. Signs of a change in the circulation pattern became evident around the middle of the month. In accord with other 5-10 day forecasts, NASA’s GEOS FP (Forward Processing) system indicated a mid-level height anomaly pattern analogous with those of prior notable long-duration and major Middle Atlantic rainfall events.
2
Joint Assimilation of SMOS brightness Temperature and GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Observations thumbnail

Joint Assimilation of SMOS brightness Temperature and GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Observations

The graph shown in this Snapshot depicts impacts of assimilating Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) terrestrial water storage data, Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) data, and both data types on the skill of a hydrological mode
3
Recent decline in lower stratospheric ozone attributed to circulation changes thumbnail

Recent decline in lower stratospheric ozone attributed to circulation changes

Stratospheric ozone plays a critical role in the Earth system by shielding the biosphere from harmful ultraviolet radiation and by influencing the planet’s radiative budget. Following a period of decline in the second half of the 20th century, ozone concentrations in the upper stratosphere (above approximately 35 km) have been shown to rise in the past two decades. A clear signal of recovery has recently emerged from satellite observations.
4